Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Fujifilm X-M1 hints and tips - part 1



Recently I bought a Fujifilm X-M1, and as I've gotten to grips with it, here's a few tips and tricks.


Firstly, where to buy. I got mine from www.camerastore.com.au and here is the bundle I got




They are in Adelaide, South Australia. The above kit is a bargain at AUD999 and since they send you a proper GST invoice you get your GST back if you travel overseas within 60 days of purchase


Secondly, check your firmware. Even though mine was brand new, it had v1.00 firmware for both the body and the 27mm lens.


  1. Check which firmware you already have by holding down the DISP/BACK button as you turn the camera on. This also checks the (mounted) lens firmware.
  2. Install new firmware. Download the appropriate .dat file, place onto the SD card, start the camera by holding down DISP/BACK and turning on. Then follow the prompts. Takes only a few moments. Although my camera was at v 1.00 and the instructions suggested I needed to be on v 1.10, going direct to 1.20 worked OK.


As of August 2013 the current firmware is:


  • body - 1.20
  • XC16-50mm F3.5-5.6 lens -  1.12
  • XF27mm F2.8 - 1.10

Thirdly, change the image capture mode to Raw and JPEG:


Press 'menu' and then down to  1 > IMAGE QUALITY > FINE + RAW


Fourthly, install a couple of apps on your Android smartphone:


  1. Photo Receiver” from Playstore. This allows you to send single images from the camera to your Android phone. It might be available on iOS, I don't have an iPhone handy to test.
  2. Camera App” allows you to browse the photos on the X-M1 from your Android phone, and retrieve the ones you want. The other features are not supported. As above, this App might be available on iOS, I don't have an iPhone handy to test. More on this when in the next part I discuss taking photos on the X-M1 and putting them onto Instagram NB “Camera Remote” only supports the Fujifilm X-T1 of the current range, as far as I can tell.


Fifth, remember that in common with other Fujifilm cameras the flash does not operate if you are in silent mode


Sixth, the most useful mode I've found is "P" since you can adjust the exposure, you get a histogram, and also easy access to settings like ISO
Seventh, the lens caps do not seem to fit very tightly, so consider getting a lanyard or other thing to hold them to the camera. Certainly mine came off in my bag a couple of times.

Thats about it for now. Part 2 will be here soon

Monday, January 13, 2014

Cycling: Do more expensive wheels make you go faster?

Cycling: Do more expensive wheels make you go faster?

When its possible to spend huge amounts of cash on wheels, does it make any difference?

When I got my new bike it was supplied with dirt cheap Shimano Alex wheels. I'd already budgeted for better wheels, initially Mavic Krysiums, but when they were not available, Fulcrum Quattros.

Before I fitted the Fulcrums, I'd done 40 rides with no changes to the bike, so how did the first 40 on the Fulcrums compare?

Shimano Alex wheels - $100 (40 rides):
Av moving: 25.84
PWR Av: 168.53
HR Av: 118.75

Fulcrum Quattro wheels - cost $350 (40 rides):
Av moving: 26.24
PWR Av: 169.5
HR Av: 114.7

Average moving speed is up 1.5% from 25.84 to 26.24. Hmmm not much...

Power has gone up a mere .5%.

More interestingly the heart rate to produce that speed and power has gone down from 118.75 to 114.7, a decrease of 3.4%.

Maybe it stems from being a mainly social rider, the speed I ride requires a certain power, and the "benefit" I get is from a lower heart rate.

However.... it means really I get less benefit, so a double edge sword. Its ironic that improving your bike leads to a reduction in its benefit to you.

Time to get a single speed steelie ie a worse bike!

In the meantime, I decided to focus on working hard by trying to keep my heart rate up.

In the last 40 rides (same bike with the Fulcrums):

Av moving speed: 26.82 up 3.8%
Av power: 182.2 up 8.1%
Av heart rate: 120.9 up 1.8%

NB: heart rate from Garmin Edge, moving speed and power from Strava

Sunday, January 12, 2014

Cycling: SPDs vs Clips - which is better?

I'm sure its a question asked many times... As it happens I can do a small test.

When I first got my current bike I wore toe clips, and did 25 rides using them. Then, changing nothing else on the bike, I switched to Shimano SPDs. In that configuration I did 40 rides.

So the two configurations were the same, apart from the pedals.

Here's a table



Clips
SPDs
SPDs "better" ?
n
25
40

total distance km
902.76
1450.55

overall av move speed kph
25.84
25.84
0.01
stdev ride move speeds kph
2.38
2.71
0.32
watts / hr mean
1.45
1.46
0.01
average power
175.00
168.53
-6.48
average heart rate
121.92
118.75
-3.17

So how about do they make me faster? Well, taking the total distance ridden and dividing by the moving time, nope, almost no change.

Here's a frequency breakdown of the average moving speed of those rides, normalised to take account of different sample sizes.




Did they cause me to produce more power? Well in terms of watts / hr the answer is, again, no. Maybe this is a function of the kind of riding I did?

What about average power (as given to me by Strava) ? Actually average power went down - shouldn't it go up?

And finally, heart rate (as measured by the Garmin HRM) to produce that power and speed... well I guess good news is that it went down over 3 bpm, though that could be just ascribed to increasing fitness?